Hip Hop, Rap, Review

Album Review: Ronny J – OMGRonny

Ronny J is the hottest underground hip-hop producer that you’ve never heard of. Over the last few years, the Miami-based producer and rapper has crafted hits for some of the most successful new artists in hip hop, such as Denzel Curry, Rich Brian, and Lil Pump. Somewhere between the glossy and highly produced work of artists like Migos and A$AP Mob and the hard-hitting underground sounds of artists like Ho99o9 and Lil Ugly Mane, Ronny J’s new project OMGRONNY is a short burst of interesting, garage-band-quality hip hop that is certain to haunt your mind like the most effective commercial jingles.

The project lends you twelve seconds of preparation before it kicks you in the face with the distorted bass and choppy percussion that persist throughout each of the tracks. While most producers would tend to avoid muddy bass and clipped percussive samples, Ronny J uses these features to create some exceedingly interesting effects. The distortion of the bass on songs like Snakes and 824 create a depth that a regular 808 could not have matched. The percussive arrangements are fairly typical of any other hip hop project you may have heard in the past three years, but the variety of pitches and effects he uses on snare and hi hat samples makes even simple patterns stand out and complement the songs greatly. Musically, the project is consistently exciting and innovative, making sure not to shy away from being too dirty or extreme.

The project relies heavily on features; only two of the eleven tracks feature no other artists. Verses from Ski Mask the Slump God (Costa Rica, Thriller (Forever)), Denzel Curry (Houston, Glacier), and Wifisfuneral (Snakes) provide much needed structure to the bulk of the tracks on the project. Ronny J’s shortcomings as a songwriter and vocalist become fairly obvious once these features are considered. His lyrics can at times seem uninspired and repetitive and his autotune-soaked vocals fail to captivate the excitement that the tracks often call for. He fails to differentiate himself from some of his contemporaries, rapping about the expensive things he owns and the women he gets (like we haven’t heard Kodak Black say the same exact things in every song he’s released in his career).  Unlike rappers like Travis Scott or Young Thug, who use Auto-Tune to enhance their vocal performances, Ronny J seems to use it to mask his uninteresting or otherwise poorly written hooks. There are, however, several moments in which he exceeds vocally. His performances on Thriller and 824 are smooth and at least fairly interesting. Without the features from more talented vocalists, the album would not survive.

Despite Ronny J’s vocal and lyrical shortcomings, his first full length project is an example of the diversity that is present in the modern hip hop scene. He differentiates himself from other current popular hip hop producers, such as Metro Boomin and Zaytoven, with a gritty and highly intense style that is unmatched by any other. He consciously avoids the same smooth bass tone and vocal production that haunts every Migos and Post Malone track you’ve heard on the radio, instead opting to use more colorful and varied sounds that would not normally be heard in a rap beat. Ronny J’s debut project serves as a vocal introduction for the producer and a showcase of unique and hard hitting beats that will certainly be some of the most memorable of the year.

7.5/10

Best tracks : Thriller, Houston, 824

Worst tracks ; Banded Up (lmao fuck xxxtentacion)

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Hip Hop, Jazz, Review, RPM

Album Review: King Krule – The Ooz

Archy Marshall is royalty, but you might not know it if you haven’t heard his music. The 23 year old London based singer, rapper, and multi-instrumentalist extraordinaire is back with The Ooz, his second full length album under the moniker King Krule. He gets his performing name from a Donkey Kong character, but more than that it’s a great descriptor of his music. Marshall’s harsh, gritty vocals create an interesting juxtaposition with the smoother beats that accompany most tracks on the album. The record fuses elements of punk, jazz, indie, and hip-hop to create an end product that sounds like a mellowed out version of John Zorn’s Naked City.

Musically, the album is extremely consistent. Most tracks feature very tight, suppressed drums, reminiscent of J Dilla or Young Marble Giants. Marshall uses catchy guitar riffs, such as those on “The Ooz” and “Slush Puppy” in unison with spacey and subdued keyboard synths (present on most every track), building tension to create beautiful, sprawling harmonies.  The last, most important ingredient to every track is his vocals, where he ranges from soft and somber to loud and aggressive depending on the lyrical content of the song.

“The Locomotive” is an introspective slow burner where Marshall describes himself waiting at a train station, plagued by his own thoughts. On “Logos” he describes a lost relationship with a woman: “We were soup together, but now it’s cold / We were glue together, but it weren’t to hold”. On these tracks, Marshall sounds more like an orator or a poet than a singer. He deals with themes of depression and isolation in a way that’s brutally honest. The accompanying instrumentals are slower and more toned down to put more of an emphasis on his vocals.

Some of the more fast paced songs include “Dum Surfer” and “Half Man Half Shark”. Marshall’s use of native jargon and his thick, clumsy accent create a clear vision of life as a punk in London. In “Dum Surfer“, he finds himself disoriented and intoxicated in a club where he scams a “dumb surfer” out of some cash. He pukes on the pavement and takes a cab home with a girl from the club, paranoid the whole trip home that the gods are out to punish him for his misdeeds. These songs feature somewhat cynical, more snarky lyrics as opposed to the introspective lyrics of most other tracks. Contrasting the more somber tone of most others on the album, these tracks serve as great changes of pace to keep the listener on their toes.

Archy Marshall presents an album that should leave any fan of alternative music excited for the future of the genre. The project marks a maturity and precision in his lyrics and showcases deep, catchy and well produced music. True as his name suggests, Archy is the new King of jazz-rap-punk fusion, if there even was one before.  

SCORE: Ooz/10

BEST TRACKS: The Locomotive, Slush Puppy, Czech One, The Ooz, Lonely Blue

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