Concert Review, Rock

A Night At The Bowery: An Intimate Evening With Turnover

Preface

Nov. 16, 2017 was a date I had marked on the calendar since a hazy summer morning in early July. I found myself on a screened in porch of a female’s house I slept in the night before. Toking a joint, I was hoping to chase away the pounding in my skull so I could make a dash to the streets. That’s when I heard the scratching of a needle on vinyl from the room beside me.

“Adolescent dreams turn to adult screams, paranoid that I won’t have all the things they say I need,”  were the first lyrics I caught by Austin Getz, the lead 

turnover1singer of the band Turnover, off their latest record at the time Peripheral Vision. It spoke to me in a way that brought me back to my youth, days where I grew my hair long below my shoulders, dying it black, and adding a blonde streak to my bangs. Nostalgia. Early 2000’s pop punk lyrics, similar to bands like Taking Back Sunday, The Used, and Mayday Parade. Basically any band I had used to make my AIM bio. The thing I liked about Turnover was how they used emo lyrics, but with a new wave sound. A indie-rock, dream-pop tone, with a melodiousness to make you want to drive through the night in the rain. I was hooked.

By August of 2017, Turnover released their third studio album Good Nature, again growing into their sound. This album swayed more into a dream-pop-california-smokeadoobie-surf some gnar-melt my ears-awesomeness-vibe. Yes, this album was different than their last two, but it was different in the way you’d hope a band you like evolves and changes. Good Nature is the kind of album I’d tell my friends to listen to cover to cover- it brings you up, and on a sunny day walking to class, it’s unmatched.

The Venue

After months of anticipation the day was finally here; I arrived in Manhattan’s Lower East Side around 6:30pm and found my way to the Bowery Ballroom, doors opened at 7pm. I was met by two bouncers at the door and shockingly enough, no line. Turnover sold out both of its NYC shows, so I found it strange I could get in so quickly.  I walked down a dark staircase into a dimly lit bar with a collection of concert goers, ages ranging from early 20’s to mid 30’s. I grabbed a drink and sat next to a couple who I asked if they were here to see Turnover; of course they said “yes” and we made conversation for a bit.Turnover2 The Ballroom where the show was to be performed wasn’t visible to me yet, as we’d have to exit through another door when the first bands came on at 8pm. I approached the bar for another drink when, walking right in front of me, stood Austin Getz, lead singer/guitar of Turnover, followed by his drummer Casey Getz and bassist Danny Dempsey. There were a mere 30 people in the bar, and there was the band: just hanging out.  At that point I knew I was in for a different concert experience.

I made my way into the concert hall at right at 8pm for the first act Gliterer (which I’ve looked up since and it seems like they literally picked him up off the streets of New York because he can’t be found in a Google search). The Ballroom is Rock N’ Roll heaven, selling out the venue with a max capacity of 575 people it was the perfect amount of filth and intimacy you’d expect from a Lower East Side establishment. Before any bands even touched the stage, the smell of cigarettes and weed engulfed the air. There were no security guards putting out the lighters and the smoke, it was NYC, it was Rock N’ Roll, and it was time for the music.

The Show

Gilterer took the stage at 8pm, which was strange at first because he was alone with no instruments, so I figured he was just one of the stage hands setting up for the first band to take front and center. Then he approached the microphone, saying “Thank you all for coming to the show early, I’m Gliterer. I just want to thank Turnover and Elvis Depressedly for having me out tonight.” Hitting play on his Macbook, the sound of synthy-dream-state beats escaped through the speakers, followed by some pretty painful lyrics relating to ghosts of girlfriend’s past. I respected the act, it takes balls to take the stage alone, especially with no instruments, but I’d tell Gliterer not to quit his day job. After about five songs Gliterer exited the stage saying his thank you’s and was met with a pretty warm applause for the act.

Elvis Depressedly, a lo-fi indie-rock band from North Carolina took the stage. Lead singer Matt Cothran entered the stage wearing black spandex pants accompanied by white Daisy Duke short-shorts and a pink glittery sport coat, echoing the style of punk rock royalty like the New York Dolls, who played this stage decades before.  The band’s music was met with open arms and singing voices. The crowd had a psychedelic feel and turnover 4there weren’t many eyelids held above half mast, “Have you ever had a serious anxiety attack when you’re on the stage in front of hundreds of people?” Cothran said to the fans, he was met with crowd laughter, though it didn’t seem like he was joking. He stared outwards from the stage with a blank face, eyes buzzing around his glasses’ frames like they wanted to jump out.  It was all part of the act: the sound of soft guitars were met with loud cheers when Depressedly began playing their popular song “Angel Come Clean”, Cothran singing “I’ve been taking Xanax, listening to Morphine”, a song that talks about taking anxiety drugs while listening to bands named after drugs, which I think is comical. Overall, Elvis Depressedly had a great stage presence and sounded the same as you hear them on the album, they made for a fun show and the crowd was engaged throughout, it even lead me to buying their vinyl post show.

Turnover entered the stage moments after Elvis Depressedly had walked off, stage lights at full blast. The band began tuning their own guitars while a generic indie playlist played in the background. Fans screamed the names of members of the band while they worked on their instruments. Then, without even a drop of the lights, the cool sounds of surf- indie-rock began pouring out of the amplifiers. They opened with the song “Super Natural”, which was poetic to the way I felt.  Austin’s voice, alongside a smooth guitar riff and relaxing bass tones, sounded like driving down the coastline of California with theturnover 5 person you’ve always dreamt of. I don’t think the audience missed a single lyric in the hour and a half Turnover was on stage. They followed up with “Nightlight Girl” another classic off of their newest album. From beginning to end the band stayed true to who they are, mixing and matching songs from their last two albums. With songs from Peripheral Vision brought mosh circles and stage dives from Turnover faithfuls living in their emo/post-hardcore past. The band even mixed in one of their singles “Humble Pleasures” from a 2 track vinyl released in 2016.

“Its intimidating to play the city, because its so unique, and so cool, and so busy all the time,” Said Getz to the crowd of 575 faithfuls.

“We’ve been a band that’s played in the New York area for a really long time, and it’s still nerve-wracking. I can’t say thank you enough, whether we know you or not, thank you so much for being here. It means a lot. THIS IS THE BIGGEST SHOW WE’VE EVER HEADLINED IN NYC.

Post Show Interview

After the show I sat down with Bassist Danny Dempsey, a New York native, to ask him some questions about the show and the band.

Q: So what was it like playing in front of a sold out crowd here in NYC?

A: Well we’ve played in front of sold out crowds here before, this is the biggest we’ve had in NYC. So it’s a pretty cool feeling. I’m originally from long Island so I’ve been playing around here my whole life.

Q: Your sound has clearly changed over the years from Magnolia to Peripheral Vision and now with Good Nature. What can you attribute that to?

A: Well you know it all comes with growing up. Our sound changes as we change, we were 17-18 when we made our first album.

Q: Do you all contribute in the song writing?

A: The songs usually start with Austin.

Q: Austin said this is the first time you’ve played the new album in America, where have you played it?

A: We just got back from being on tour in Europe, so yeah, it was heard all over Europe. But its great to have played it in NYC first.

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